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Wicca is a modern pagan, witchcraft religion. It was developed in England during the first half of the 20th century and it was introduced to the public in 1952 by Gerald Gardner, a retired British civil servant. It draws upon a diverse set of ancient pagan and 20th century hermetic motifs for its theological structure and ritual practice. Wicca is a diverse religion with no central authority or figure defining it. It is divided into various lineages and denominations, referred to as \traditions\, each with its own organisational structure and level of centralisation. Due to its decentralized nature, there is some disagreement over what actually constitutes Wicca. Some traditions, collectively referred to as British Traditional Wicca, strictly follow the initiatory lineage of Gardner and consider the term \Wicca\ to apply only to such lineaged traditions, while other eclectic traditions do not. Wicca is typically duotheistic, worshipping a god and goddess traditionally viewed as a mother goddess and horned god. These two deities are often viewed as facets of a greater pantheistic godhead. However, beliefs range from \hard\ polytheism to even monotheism. Wiccan celebration follows approximately eight seasonally based festivals known as Sabbats. An unattributed statement known as the Wiccan Rede is the traditional basis of Wiccan morality. Wicca involves the ritual practice of magic.





Wicca Top Facts

Wicca
Wicca /ˈwɪkə/ is a modern pagan religion. Developed in England in the first half of the 20th century, Wicca was popularised in the 1950s and early 1960s by a retired British civil servant named Gerald Gardner, who at the time called it the "witch cult" and "witchcraft", and its adherents "the Wica". From the 1960s onward, the name of the religion was normalised to "Wicca".
WiccaPaganismWiccaWitchcraftNeopagan traditions

Broom
A broom is a cleaning tool consisting of stiff fibers attached to, and roughly parallel to, a cylindrical handle, the broomstick. It is thus a variety of brush with a long handle. It is commonly used in combination with a dustpan. An old form of broom was the besom, which was made simply of twigs tied to a handle, and was relatively inefficient as a cleaning implement for it commonly caused more of a mess than it cleaned up causing it to be somewhat counter-productive.
BroomWiccan terminologyWiccaCleaning toolsDomestic implementsWitchcraft

Gardnerian Wicca
Gardnerian Wicca, or Gardnerian Witchcraft, is a tradition or Religious sect in the neopagan religion of Wicca, whose members can trace initiatory descent from Gerald Gardner. The tradition is itself named after Gardner (1884–1964), a British civil servant and scholar of magic. The term "Gardnerian" was probably coined by the founder of Cochranian Witchcraft, Robert Cochrane in the 1950s or 60s, who himself left that tradition to found his own.
Gardnerian WiccaWiccan traditions

Triple Goddess (Neopaganism)
This article discusses the "Maiden, Mother, Crone" goddess triad of certain forms of Neopaganism. See triple goddesses for other uses. The Triple Goddess is the subject of much of the writing of Robert Graves, and has been adopted by many neopagans (notably Wiccans) as one of their primary deities . The term triple goddess is infrequently used outside of Neopaganism to instead refer to historical goddess triads and single goddesses of three forms or aspects.
Triple Goddess (Neopaganism)GoddessesWiccaTriple deitiesNeopaganismFertility goddessesWisdom goddessesLunar goddessesVirgin goddessesEarth goddesses

Kemetism
Kemetism (also Kemeticism; both from km. t, the native name of Ancient Egypt) is a term for Egyptian neopaganism, i.e. neopagan revivals of Ancient Egyptian religion which developed in the United States from the 1970s onwards. There are several main groups, each of which take a different approach to their beliefs, ranging from eclectic to polytheistic reconstructionist.
KemetismNeopaganism in the United StatesKemetic ReligionNeopagan traditions

British Traditional Wicca
British Traditional Wicca (abbreviated BTW) is a term used to describe some Wiccan traditions which have their origins in the New Forest region of England. The most prominent such traditions are Gardnerian Wicca and Alexandrian Wicca, but other traditions either derived from them or claiming a shared New Forest history, are also considered to be British Traditional Wicca. In the case of some traditions, some lines are considered to be British Traditional Wicca and some are not.
British Traditional WiccaWiccan traditions

Hellenic polytheism

Hellenic polytheism

Reclaiming (Neopaganism)
Reclaiming is an international community of women and men working to combine earth-based spirituality and political activism. Its predecessor organization, the Reclaiming Collective, was founded in 1979 by two Neopagan women of Jewish descent, Starhawk and Diane Baker, in order to explore and develop feminist Neopagan emancipatory rituals. Today, the organization focuses on progressive social, political, environmental and economic activism.
Reclaiming (Neopaganism)Pagan religious organizationsNeopaganism in the United StatesFeminist spiritualityNeopagan traditions

Magic circle
A magic circle is circle or sphere of space marked out by practitioners of many branches of ritual magic, which they generally believe will contain energy and form a sacred space, or will provide them a form of magical protection, or both. It may be marked physically, drawn in salt or chalk, for example, or merely visualised. Its spiritual significance is similar to that of mandala and yantra in some Eastern religions.
Magic circleMagic symbolsWicca

Wicca (disambiguation)

Wicca (disambiguation)

LGBT topics and Wicca
Throughout most branches of Wicca, all sexual orientations including homosexuality are considered healthy and positive, provided that individual sexual relationships are healthy and loving. Sexual orientation is therefore not considered an issue. Although Gerald Gardner, a key figure in Wicca, was arguably homophobic this historical aversion is not now commonly held.
LGBT topics and WiccaLGBT topics and religionWicca

History of Wicca
The history of Wicca documents the rise of the Neopagan religion of Wicca and related witchcraft-based Neopagan religions. Wicca originated in the early twentieth century, when it first developed amongst several secretive covens in England who were basing their religious beliefs and practices upon what they read of the historical Witch-Cult in the works of such writers as Margaret Murray.
History of WiccaHistory of religionWicca

Alexandrian

Alexandrian

Seax-Wica
Seax-Wica is a tradition, or denomination, of the neopagan religion of Wicca which is largely inspired by the iconography of the historical Anglo-Saxon paganism, though, unlike Theodism, it is not a reconstruction of the early mediaeval religion itself. The tradition was founded in 1973 by Raymond Buckland, an English-born High Priest of Gardnerian Wicca who moved to the United States in the 1970s.
Seax-WicaWiccan traditionsReligious organizations established in 1973

Celtic Wicca
Celtic Wicca is a modern tradition of Wicca that incorporates some elements of Celtic mythology. It employs the same basic theology, rituals and beliefs as most other forms of Wicca. Celtic Wiccans use the names of Celtic deities, mythological figures, and seasonal festivals within a Wiccan ritual structure and belief system, rather than a historically Celtic one.
Celtic WiccaWiccan traditions

Odyssean Wicca
Odyssean Wicca is a Wiccan tradition created in Toronto, Ontario, Canada in the late 1970s. Its principal founders were Tamarra and Richard James. Most of its practitioners today live in Ontario, but it also has members in the United States. The tradition differs from other initiatory Wiccan traditions in its emphasis on preparation of its members for public priesthood.
Odyssean WiccaWiccan traditions

Algard Wicca
Algard Wicca is a tradition, or denomination, in the Neo-Pagan religion of Wicca. It was founded in the United States in 1972 by Mary Nesnick, a High Priestess in both Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wicca, in an attempt to fuse the two traditions. Because of this fusion, it is categorised under the heading of British Traditional Wicca, with its initiates being able to trace their lineage back to Gerald Gardner, the founder of modern day Wicca.
Algard WiccaWiccan traditions

Magical tools in Wicca
In the neopagan religion of Wicca, a range of magical tools are used in ritual practice. Each of these tools has different uses and associations, and are used primarily to direct magical energies. They are used at an altar, inside a magic circle. In traditional Gardnerian Wicca, the tools are often divided into personal tools, which are for use by, and owned by, an individual Wiccan, and coven tools, used collectively by the coven.
Magical tools in WiccaRitual weaponsCeremonial weaponsWiccaFormal insignia

Something Wicca This Way Comes
"Something Wicca This Way Comes" is the first episode of the drama series, Charmed, which was broadcast on The WB network. This is the series premiere of Charmed and the second (and only aired) pilot for the series. The original pilot never aired. The unaired pilot was shot in the actual manor that is shown on the show. After replacing Lori Rom, the show moved to a sound studio. Lori Rom left Charmed because of personal reasons.
Something Wicca This Way ComesCharmed episodes1998 television episodesTelevision pilots

Sweep (book series)
Sweep is fictional novel series created by Cate Tiernan. The discovery that she is a descendant of a long and powerful line of witches, finds Morgan Rowland battling the forces of dark and sinister magick.
Sweep (book series)Wiccan booksContemporary fantasy novelsFictional witchesFantasy books by series

Postmodern religion
Postmodern religion can be defined as any type of religion that is influenced, interpreted or shaped by postmodernism and postmodern philosophies. Examples of religions that may be interpreted using postmodern philosophy include Postmodern Christianity, Postmodern Neopaganism, and Postmodern Buddhism.
Postmodern religionPhilosophical movementsPostmodernismPostmodern religionReligion

Blue Star Wicca
Blue Star Wicca is one of a number of Wiccan traditions, and was created in the United States in the 1970s based loosely on the Gardnerian and Alexandrian traditions. It continues to be practiced today in areas of the United States, as well as having members in the United Kingdom, Ireland and Canada.
Blue Star WiccaWiccan traditionsReligious organizations established in 1975

Universal Eclectic Wicca
Universal Eclectic Wicca (UEW) is one of a number of distinctly American Wiccan traditions which developed following the introduction of Gardnerian and Alexandrian Wicca to the United States in the early 1960s. Its corporate body is the Church of Universal Eclectic Wicca (CUEW) which is incorporated and based in Great Falls, Virginia.
Universal Eclectic WiccaArticle Feedback 5Wiccan traditionsReligious organizations established in 1969

Christianity and Neopaganism
Christianity and Neopaganism overlap when the beliefs or practices of one religious path influence, or are adopted by, the other. Historically, Christianity sometimes took advantage of traditional pagan beliefs when it spread to new areas – a process known as inculturation. Thus newly established churches took on sites, practices or images belonging to indigenous belief systems as a way of making the new faith more acceptable.
Christianity and NeopaganismNeopaganismChristianity and Paganism

Neo-Wicca

Neo-Wicca

Altar (Wicca)
A Wiccan altar is typically a piece of furniture, such as a table or chest, upon which a Wiccan practitioner places several symbolic and functional items for the purpose of worshiping the God and Goddess, casting spells, and/or saying chants and prayers. Upon the altar typically rests a cloth, used to protect the surface from damage by candle wax, spilled liquid, or dust from burnt incense. This cloth is often adorned by a pentacle, or other spiritual symbol.
Altar (Wicca)Wicca

Wikipedia:WikiProject Neopaganism

Wikipedia:WikiProject Neopaganism

Inclusive Wicca Tradition
Inclusive Wicca Is an Eclectic Wiccan Tradition which developed from the Oak & Mistletoe Teaching Coven founded by Amethyst Treleven. It aims to present Wicca in an open way that adapts to the needs of individual seekers. The corporate body of the tradition is the Community Church of Inclusive Wicca Incorporated, which is registered as a church in South Australia.
Inclusive Wicca TraditionWiccan traditionsReligious organizations established in 2008Organisations based in Adelaide

Georgian Wicca
Georgian Wicca is a tradition, or denomination, in the neopagan religion of Wicca. In its organisation, it is very similar to British Traditional Wicca groups such as Gardnerian Wicca, however, it does not trace its initiatory line to one of the old English covens. The name "Georgian" refers to its founder, George Patterson, who founded the tradition in 1970 in the United States.
Georgian WiccaWiccan traditionsReligious organizations established in 1970

Something Wicca This Way Goes

Something Wicca This Way Goes

Seax Wicca

Seax Wicca

Paganism and Wicca in Australia
Wicca is seen to be one of the fastest growing religions in Australia. According to the 2006 census, 15,516 Australians identify themselves as pagans & 8,214 Australians identify themselves as Wiccan/Witchcraft.
Paganism and Wicca in AustraliaReligion in AustraliaPaganismWicca

Central Valley Wicca
Central Valley Wicca, sometimes abbreviated as CVW, refers to a particular group of traditions within the Neopagan religion of Wicca which trace their roots to a group of Wiccan practitioners who brought their practice from England to the Central Valley of California at some point in the early 1960s. It is one branch of British Traditional Wicca, alongside Gardnerian, Alexandrian Wicca and Mohsian, as defined by New Wiccan Church in California.
Central Valley WiccaReligious organizations established in the 1960sWiccan traditions

Wicca Craft

Wicca Craft

Wicca Envy

Wicca Envy

Wicca (etymology)
In the language of Modern English, the term "Wicca" is used to refer to the religion of contemporary Pagan Witchcraft, however there are two different definitions of the term currently being used in the Pagan community.
Wicca (etymology)NeopaganismWicca

Wikipedia:Peer review/Wicca/archive1

Wikipedia:Peer review/Wicca/archive1

Chthonioi Alexandrian Wicca
Chthonioi Alexandrian Wicca is a Boston-area family of Alexandrian Wicca-derived covens directly downline from Coven Chthonioi. Coven Chthonioi grew out of the Alexandrian practice of its founders in the 1970s, has an unbroken lineage back to Alex Sanders and Maxine Sanders, and has been in continuous operation since 1974. This coven is the originator of the cycle of rituals that has become known as the Book of the Provider.
Chthonioi Alexandrian WiccaWiccan traditionsWicca

Faery Wicca
Faery Wicca, or Fairy Wicca is an umbrella term that refers to any tradition of modern Wicca that places an emphasis on the Fey, their lore, and their relation to the natural world. "Faery Wicca" may also refer to a specific tradition of Wicca, recently founded by author Kisma Stepanich.
Faery WiccaWiccan traditions

Church and School of Wicca 1

Church and School of Wicca 1

Summoner (Wicca)
The Summoner, sometimes called a Fetch is a position in many traditional Wiccan covens. The primary, or at least most evident, function of the Summoner is to call other coven members to a meeting or ritual. The summoner is also responsible for all inter-coven communication and traditionally is the only member of a coven who will know where other covens reside. (This tradition is generally not followed today and there is argument about to what extent it was ever followed.
Summoner (Wicca)WiccaWiccan terminology

Church and School of Wicca 2

Church and School of Wicca 2